View Other Topics

Named Summer Storms

Jun 13, 2017

It's the time for hurricanes and cyclones in the Northern Hemisphere.  Here from NOAA are the lists of names used for this the next five years.  Also included is the new system used by the Meteorology Office in the United Kingdom.
 
Make sure if live in an area that can be impacted by these awesome giants of nature please Google what you need to be prepared in the even one does show up at your doorstep!
 
Hurricane season is upon us in the Northern Hemisphere and it's time to pull out the list of names that will be given to each of the storms that reach a certain criteria according to the National Hurricane Center (which is part of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce).
 
Also included are the new names that the United Kingdom  Meteorological Office (UKMet) used for their winter storms.
 
Atlantic Names
 
Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms had been named from lists originated by the National Hurricane Center. They are now maintained and updated through a strict procedure by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization.
 
2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Don
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irma
Jose
Katia
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rina
Sean
Tammy
Vince
Whitney
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sara
Tony
Valerie
William
Andrea
Barry
Chantal
Dorian
Erin
Fernand
Gabrielle
Humberto
Imelda
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Melissa
Nestor
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy
Arthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gonzalo
Hanna
Isaias
Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paulette
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred
Ana
Bill
Claudette
Danny
Elsa
Fred
Grace
Henri
Ida
Julian
Kate
Larry
Mindy
Nicholas
Odette
Peter
Rose
Sam
Teresa
Victor
Wanda
Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
Ian
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Martin
Nicole
Owen
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tobias
Virginie
Walter

 
The six lists above are used in rotation and re-cycled every six years, i.e., the 2017 list will be used again in 2023. The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity. If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the WMO committee (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it. Several names have been retired since the lists were created. Here is more information the history of naming tropical cyclones and retired names.
 
If a storm forms in the off-season, it will take the next name in the list based on the current calendar date. For example, if a tropical cyclone formed on December 28th, it would take the name from the previous season's list of names. If a storm formed in February, it would be named from the subsequent season's list of names.
 
In the event that more than twenty-one named tropical cyclones occur in the Atlantic basin in a season, additional storms will take names from the Greek alphabet.
 
Eastern North Pacific Names
These lists are also re-cycled every six years (the 2017 list will be used again in 2023).
 
2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Adrian
Beatriz
Calvin
Dora
Eugene
Fernanda
Greg
Hilary
Irwin
Jova
Kenneth
Lidia
Max
Norma
Otis
Pilar
Ramon
Selma
Todd
Veronica
Wiley
Xina
York
Zelda
Aletta
Bud
Carlotta
Daniel
Emilia
Fabio
Gilma
Hector
Ileana
John
Kristy
Lane
Miriam
Norman
Olivia
Paul
Rosa
Sergio
Tara
Vicente
Willa
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke
Alvin
Barbara
Cosme
Dalila
Erick
Flossie
Gil
Henriette
Ivo
Juliette
Kiko
Lorena
Mario
Narda
Octave
Priscilla
Raymond
Sonia
Tico
Velma
Wallis
Xina
York
Zelda
Amanda
Boris
Cristina
Douglas
Elida
Fausto
Genevieve
Hernan
Iselle
Julio
Karina
Lowell
Marie
Norbert
Odalys
Polo
Rachel
Simon
Trudy
Vance
Winnie
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke
Andres
Blanca
Carlos
Dolores
Enrique
Felicia
Guillermo
Hilda
Ignacio
Jimena
Kevin
Linda
Marty
Nora
Olaf
Pamela
Rick
Sandra
Terry
Vivian
Waldo
Xina
York
Zelda
Agatha
Blas
Celia
Darby
Estelle
Frank
Georgette
Howard
Ivette
Javier
Kay
Lester
Madeline
Newton
Orlene
Paine
Roslyn
Seymour
Tina
Virgil
Winifred
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke

 
Central North Pacific Names
The names are used one after the other. When the bottom of one list is reached, the next name is the top of the next list.
 
List 1 List 2 List 3 List 4
Akoni
Ema
Hone
Iona
Keli
Lala
Moke
Nolo
Olana
Pena
Ulana
Wale
Aka
Ekeka
Hene
Iolana
Keoni
Lino
Mele
Nona
Oliwa
Pama
Upana
Wene
Alika
Ele
Huko
Iopa
Kika
Lana
Maka
Neki
Omeka
Pewa
Unala
Wali
Ana
Ela
Halola
Iune
Kilo
Loke
Malia
Niala
Oho
Pali
Ulika
Walaka

 
UK Met Office Names
Starting in Winter 2015, severe storms in the United Kingdom are given names in the same way that hurricanes are named in the Americas. Each storm is given a name from a list which is maintained by the UK Meteorological Office and the Irish Met Eireann service.
 
2015-16 Date Speed 2016-17 Date Speed
Abigail 12-13 Nov 2015 84mph Angus 19-20 Nov 2016 106mph
Barney 17-18 Nov 2015 85mph Barbara 23-24 Dec 2016 83mph
Clodagh 29 Nov 2017 97mph Conor 25-27 Dec 2016 85mph
Desmond 4-6 Dec 2015 81mph Doris 23 Feb 2017 94mph
Eva 23-24 Dec 2015 84mph Ewan 26 Feb 2017 70mph
Frank 29-30 Dec 2015 85mph Fleur    
Gertrude 29 Jan 2016 105mph Gabriel    
Henry 1-2 Feb 2016 90mph Holly    
Imogen 8 Feb 2016 96mph Ivor    
Jake 1-4 Mar 2016 83mph Jacqui    
Katie 25-28 Mar 2016 106mph Kamil    
Lawrence     Louise    
Mary     Malcolm    
Nigel     Natalie    
Orla     Oisin    
Phil     Penelope    
Rhonda     Robert    
Steve     Susan    
Tegan     Thomas    
Vernon     Valerie    
Wendy     Wilbert    

 
To avoid confusion, if a storm is the remnant of a named hurricane or tropical storm then it will retain that name, e.g. "Ex-hurricane Cristobal," rather than take on a new name from the list below.
 
Starting June 1, 2007 select U.S. Coast Guard stations will hoist storm flags in foul weather: red triangle for small craft warning; double red triangle for gale warning; single red-and-black square for storm warning; and the feared double flags for hurricane warning.
 

Image:  Double hurricane flag U.S. - U.S. Weather Service & U.S. Coast Guard

 

 


Share This Blog with Friends!

Tags:
#hurricanes,#NOAA,#summer#storms#tropical#storms,#starzpsychics.com,#starz#advisors